New Study Shows Strong Labor Market for Scientists and Engineers

Number of people working in S&E occupations up since 2003.

New government data shows the current scientist and engineering labor force is expanding, there are more new graduates, and people are able to find employment, or are continuing their education.
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Science and engineering workforce availability in the United States is under serious scrutiny by observers who worry about a decline in the nation's ability to fill future demand. But, three newly published government reports show increasing supplies of scientists and engineers, as well as a strong labor market for those occupations.

According to the studies, the number of individuals working in science and engineering (S&E) occupations grew by 4.3 percent between 2003 and 2006, while their unemployment rate dropped to 2.5 percent in 2006, its lowest since the early 1990s. "On the supply side, we can say that the current S&E labor force is expanding, new graduates are coming out, and people are able to find employment, or are continuing their education," says Nimmi Kannankutty, the National Science Foundation (NSF) program manager responsible for compiling the data, which NSF released last month.

The biennial surveys collect data on scientists and engineers—defined as people who have a bachelor's degree or higher in science, engineering or related degrees or occupations.

NSF collects data on these individuals with three separate national surveys: the National Survey of College Graduates, the National Survey of Recent College Graduates, and the Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Collectively, these surveys are known as the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System, or SESTAT.

The first report records data on the overall science and engineering workforce, specifically the number of individuals working in science and engineering occupations since 2003. Overall unemployment for scientists and engineers in the United States dropped to 2.5 percent in 2006. "The drop was consistent across all degree levels and almost all science and engineering occupations," said Kannankutty.

Unemployment rates for the entire U.S. labor force in 2003 and 2006 were 6 percent and 4.7 percent respectively as compared with the 3.2 percent and 2.5 percent posted for scientists and engineers, maintaining the historical norm of lower unemployment rates than for the overall labor market.

These statistics reflect the labor market as of 2006 and do not represent the current status of the S&E workforce. A separate report on new graduates also shows potential for a new influx of S&E workers. In 2006, there were 1.9 million new science, engineering and health graduates with degrees earned in academic years 2003 to 2005 in the United States. Nearly all of those new graduates either entered the workforce or moved on to higher education. Women made up more than 50 percent of these new science, engineering and health graduates, but this varied by specific field.

The third report on U.S. doctorates shows that 45 percent of those who have earned a doctoral degree in a science, engineering or health field from a U.S. university held a postdoctoral position at sometime in their careers. Postdoctoral positions are typically short-term temporary appointments for the purpose of additional education and training in research. NSF statistics show the median length of postdoctoral positions has remained about 2 years, continuing a 30-year trend.

"The academic sector remains the place where most postdocs are employed," says Kannankutty. "After completing the postdoc, many of these individuals continue their careers in the business and industry or government sectors."

More recent doctoral graduates report a higher rate of having held a postdoctoral position than those who graduated earlier. Overall, Kannankutty said, "The data show there was a strong labor market for scientists and engineers in 2006."

—Bobbie Mixon/NSF

This report is provided by the National Science Foundation, an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering, in partnership with U.S. News and World Report.