Job Interview Tips and Techniques

I've been in my field for over 20 years and the one thing that I've come to appreciate more is the importance of doing your homework on a company ["How to Answer 10 Tricky Interview Questions," usnews.com].

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I've been in my field for over 20 years and the one thing that I've come to appreciate more is the importance of doing your homework on a company ["How to Answer 10 Tricky Interview Questions," usnews.com]. You may never be asked anything to check your knowledge on where you are interviewing but nonetheless, the more you know, the more you can seamlessly integrate into the interview process. This might seem like small potatoes, but in the end, you can score big by knowing something not plastered across a company's homepage.

Comment by Joe of NY 

I say you should mostly be yourself, and be very honest. Remember that you are also interviewing your potential employer. You may find during the course of the interview that you are not a fit for the job. You don't want to convince an employer to hire you based on your telling them what they want to hear. I am by no means an expert on this subject. So, take my comments with a grain of salt.

Comment by Tom of MA 

I've been in hundreds of interviews over the past 25 years, and not once has anyone ever asked me who my hero is. Your advice is "come prepared." That just adds unnecessary prep work and stress to the job seeker. Should they also come prepared to answer what kind of tree they would be if they were a tree, the name of their favorite Greek poet, and the best time of day to fish for rainbow trout? It's better that they stay cool and just say, "Interesting question—let me think about it for a second." Indeed, as an interviewer (and I've conducted numerous interviews), I'd rather have my interviewee stop and think than to blurt out some rehearsed answer. That's because a thinker is who I want on the job, not a programmed robot. My advice to job hunters? When it comes to these silly questions, it's not the answers—it's your attitude, intelligence, and affability. If you pick the wrong "hero," who cares, as long as you're confident, thoughtful, and pleasant to talk to.

Comment by Freddy J. Nager of CA 

I hate job interviews! You have to go in there and describe yourself like you're a new car or something. You end up going home wondering if you sold yourself to the employer. Your resume should tell them everything they need to know. If not, they can always call your references and ask if you're a good worker. I'm just not a person who likes to talk about myself. I mean I can say, "I'm a hard worker," but are you just going to take my word for it!?

Comment by Tia of TX 

I have been interviewed literally hundreds of times over the past 27 years and honestly I have only been asked questions 1 and 4. The most common question asked of me that was not on this list is to identify a personal weakness. The best way to handle this question is to indicate a mild fault that you have and either indicate that you are working on this issue or you could mention a positive trait about yourself that could be perceived as a redeeming aspect relative to your stated weakness.

Comment by Chris of PA 

I've always stuck to the idea that honesty is the best policy. Be yourself and answer the questions candidly...that's the only way you can know if you did your part toward finding a good match for you and your new work environment/boss. It's worked for me!

Comment by Amy of TX 

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