Palin's 'Going Rogue' Review

The book is a pretty quick read—interesting when it comes to Sarah's personal life, but snotty the way she comments about the journalists and the campaign people ["Mothers Discuss Sarah Palin's 'Going Rogue' on NPR," usnews.com].

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The book is a pretty quick read—interesting when it comes to Sarah's personal life, but snotty the way she comments about the journalists and the campaign people ["Mothers Discuss Sarah Palin's 'Going Rogue' on NPR," usnews.com]. I kept waiting for some kind of "a-ha" moment, where she learned something about herself or why she really decided to follow a certain path, but the book was mostly about how she's just better than the people she doesn't like and how they're just plain jealous or mean or both. She's vain, petty, and rationalizes a lot. I didn't care much for her as a politician before the book—too inexperienced, in my opinion, and too reliant on her charm instead of her intelligence. I like her even less now after having read the book. She reminds me of the popular cheerleader in high school who suddenly finds herself a small fish in a big pond when she goes to college and can't believe she's not as important or as talented as she always thought she was.

Comment by Katie Van Winkle of ME

I am reading Sarah's book, and I can't figure out why so many people hate her. Let's see, she loves Alaska and America with all her heart. She worked to pay her college tuition and she has always been very hard-working. She has always been frugal. She became a real Christian when she was a young teen. She loves her kids and she chose to have her Down's syndrome child. She had Democrats, Republicans, and independents on her staff as governor, and she is not rigid and intolerant like Obama's side claims. She can have civil discussions with people who hold opposing views. The more I read, the more I admire her. I work with people who hate her and can't talk about her without using abusive language. It makes me sick. The media has spread so many lies about her. I think she's awesome.

Comment by Susan H. of MN

I listened to the discussion on NPR. I didn't understand why none of the participants pointed out that Palin presents herself as a bold, no-nonsense, tell-it-like-she-see's-it regular gal, but she spends a good portion of the book blaming others for her inability to stand up for what she knew to be right during the campaign, from her unsuccessful interviews to the expensive designer clothes. You can't claim to be feisty and submissively follow orders at the same time. One of the participants said she really thought Palin was a feminist at heart, but how does her unwillingness to take responsibility for her choices or her decision to quit her job as governor help other women to be taken seriously? Finally, I was frustrated to hear one participant say that she really admired and identified with Palin's view of motherhood. I am a mother and I would never make many of the choices she has made regarding her children: from announcing her young daughter's pregnancy to the world to parading her special needs toddler around with her on her book signing tour. Perhaps these topics were discussed, but not aired. Ultimately, I came away baffled again, by how Sarah Palin can contradict herself over and over again and still be seen as appealing and honest.

Comment by Pat of MD

Several people have noted that there is a lot of hatred for Palin. They're right, of course. I don't know why people feel so strongly about her, and I don't particularly care. The bottom line is that she has yet to posit a coherent—much less worthwhile—set of policy objectives. Until she does (and I'm not holding my breath), her admirers will continue to admire her for her personal traits and the slogans she throws around so loosely, and her detractors will continue to seize on her more boneheaded statements and construct straw man (straw woman?) arguments accordingly. It doesn't say much for the state of our political discourse.

Comment by Todd of PA

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