What Voters Want

Being able to read and assess information in your magazine is essential to our way of life as a democracy [Editor's Note: "Elections and Objectivity," September 15-22].

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Being able to read and assess information in your magazine is essential to our way of life as a democracy [Editor's Note: "Elections and Objectivity," September 15-22]. I often see letters to the editor from people offended by facts and only wanting to see, hear, and read what they deem as proper. However, more people than it may appear appreciate the value of making a strong statement in print and supporting it with facts. There are many who value journalism and the need for tough questioning, factual reporting, and smart analysis. Keep up the work you are doing!

Lou Toliver

Buford, Ga. One hears so much about the right and the left. Well, I have a right ear and a left ear. I listen with both. I have a heart and a brain, also. No further explanation is necessary. I taught my students in the first grade, many years ago, not to believe everything they read. I wonder if they remember?

Joan P. HansenSun

City Center, Fla. With the news focus on the November presidential election, I am dismayed by the realization that with the electoral college system of electing the president, each vote I have cast since 1984 has been thrown away because I have not voted with the majority in my state. It is a near certainty that Oklahoma will go for Senator McCain, and since I do not support him, if I vote, my vote will again be wasted. The low voter turnout for our presidential elections is widely lamented in the press, but if a person is voting in a non-competitive state and prefers the candidate whose loss is nearly certain, why should that person vote? I feel disenfranchised by the electoral college system. If I vote, my vote will only be symbolic.

Charlie Transue

Tulsa , Okla.