The Snowden Consensus

Maybe this will lead to easier negotiations on the coming partisan issues.

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Chairman the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) answers questions on the millions of Verizon phone records being collected by the NSA.

Something unexpected has resulted from the traitorous acts of Edward Snowden – consensus. We have seen Republican Rep. Peter King of New York agree with Democrat Sen. Diane Feinstein of California that Snowden is a criminal and should be tried for treason; many others have followed suit from both sides of the isle.

Amid the glut of partisan gridlock that has engulfed our government for what seems to be the better part of the last decade, this is a welcome change. There is no question that we all would prefer that bipartisanship could be found not only when historic damage is done to United States national security. However, the fact that there is apparent agreement and cooperation on how to deal with the massive breach caused by Snowden is encouraging.

[Read the U.S. News Debate: Should Americans Be Worried About the National Security Agency's Data Collection?]

There is a plethora of vital, and divisive, issues coming to the forefront over the next several months. From investigations into the Benghazi, IRS and AP Scandals to Obamacare implementation, and most importantly, the immigration debate, there are plenty of opportunities for Democrats and Republicans to descend into gridlock.

No one is naïve enough to think that coming together in reacting to the leaks by Snowden will all of a sudden make those in Washington see the light and abandon partisanship. Nevertheless, it is logical to hope that seeing eye to eye on the security breach will make a working resolution on the above issue more plausible.

  • Read Robert Schlesinger: Congress Secretely Likes Sequestration
  • Read Penny Lee: Will the Patriot Act Define 2016?
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