Should Trump's Presidential Talk Be Taken Seriously?

The businessman again says he's considering running for the GOP nomination.

Donald Trump
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Business mogul Donald Trump is once again considering a run for president, he told National Review. Trump talked about possibly throwing his hat into the ring for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, but ultimately announced in the spring of 2011 that he would not run.

Trump, who has made his fortune in real estate and investing, is also host of the television reality show "The Apprentice." He said he was hesitant to abandon his business commitments in the last election, but now feels confident his family could manage them in his absence.

"It's very difficult for me to make a commitment, with 'The Apprentice' and so many things," Trump said. "It's harder for me than some politician who says, 'I guess I'll run.' So that's the thing I have to keep looking at. I want to watch what happens with the 2014 elections, and then make a final decision after those elections."

[ See a collection of political cartoons on the Republican Party.]

In 2016, Trump would be a longshot for the nomination. He was briefly at the top of the pool in the Republican primary in 2011, once polling ahead of eventual nominee Mitt Romney, but he has not had a significant role in the party's politics since the election. Many considered 2011 a publicity stunt for his television show, rather than a legitimate campaign.

The businessman said he has spent $1 million exploring how he could win the Republican nomination, and will travel to Iowa in August to speak at an evangelical event. Those considering a presidential bid often test the waters in that state, one of the first to hold its primary elections. Trump said presidential elections shouldn't be popularity contests, but said he has a large base of people fed up with the direction the country is going:

I have a large following of people who are tired of seeing this country ripped off, and taken advantage of [by] everyone who does business with us. We used to be the smart one of the block, and now we're the dummies on the block. They want to see me, and I want to see them.

Trump has no experience in politics, but is an outspoken critic of President Barack Obama, leading the "birther" movement questioning whether or not the president was born in the United States. His campaign eventually led Obama to release a copy of his long form birth certificate to prove his citizenship.

What do you think? Should Donald Trump's presidential talk be taken seriously? Take the poll and comment below.

This poll is now closed, but the debate continues in the comments section.