Breaking the Hold of Two-Party Politics

Professor Charles Wheelan explains how two-party politics is failing the United States, but centrists could change the Senate landscape.

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How can the average citizen be a part of this political change?

That is the million-dollar question. The question here is: Do you think the system is broken? And I think most people are going to say yes. And question two is: Are you prepared to do something about it? It really comes down to the kind of people who are expressing how unhappy they are at backyard barbecues and church picnics [getting] mobilized around a different way of doing things.

What will most surprise readers of your book?

That there is a way to break the gridlock. I think people have been hopeless because they've been thinking that this system is so entrenched that there's nothing they can do. The strategy around electing Senate candidates is new. There is actually a reasonable path here that can break the stranglehold that the two parties have on the current system.

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