Venezuela waits ruling on whether jailed opposition leader to face charges on protest violence

The Associated Press

Women wearing white and homemade signs that read in Spanish; "Freedom for Leopoldo," shout slogans in support of opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez outside the Palace of Justice in Caracas, Venezuela, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014. Following a dramatic surrender on Tuesday and a night in jail, Lopez is due in court Wednesday to learn what charges he may face for allegedly provoking violence during protests against the socialist government in the divided nation. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

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By BEN FOX and ANDREW ROSATI, Associated Press

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Held at a military jail, opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez waited to learn Wednesday if he will be charged for violence that has erupted during protests that have revitalized challenges to 15 years of socialist rule in the oil-rich nation.

Lopez, who dramatically surrendered to authorities before thousands of cheering supporters Tuesday, was to appear before a judge to learn what charges he would face for organizing mass demonstrations that have resulted in at least six deaths and more than 100 injuries over the past week.

The hearing was closed and the outcome had not been announced by late Wednesday as sporadic protests continued to erupt throughout the capital, with protesters setting fires in the streets and police firing volleys of tear gas and blasts from water cannons.

The government of President Nicolas Maduro has accused Lopez, a 42-year-old former mayor and the leader of the Popular Will party, of attempting to foment a coup in the South American nation and authorities had said he could face charges that include homicide and causing grievous bodily harm.

A judicial official told The Associated Press that prosecutors were leaning toward discarding homicide and terrorism charges, opting instead to pursue less serious counts such as arson and incitement to commit crimes. That would allow the possibility of Lopez being released pending trial, according to the official, who agreed to discuss the matter only if not quoted by name because the decision had not been made public.

Hundreds of supporters waited outside the courthouse for news of the decision, watched over by National Guard troops. Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma, a member of a different opposition party, showed up at one point in a sign of unity among the foes of the Maduro government.

"We are all united in demanding the release of Leopoldo Lopez," Ledezma told the AP. "We are rallying behind him."

The crowd dissipated after hours of waiting when officials decided to hold the court hearing at the military jail outside Caracas where Lopez was being detained.

The opposition has planned nationwide marches for Saturday to protest both his detention as well as the rampant crime, shortages of consumer goods and inflation rate of more than 50 percent that has made life difficult for many in the country of nearly 30 million people.

The jailing of Lopez has made him a cause celebre among opponents of Maduro, eclipsing to some degree Henrique Capriles, the opposition's two-time losing presidential candidate who was building support for another challenge in two years.

Capriles attended a rally on Feb. 12 in Caracas led by Lopez but did not appear on the stage to address the masses of demonstrators. Clashes with police erupted afterward, after the opposition leaders had left, and resulted in three deaths. In Twitter messages, he accused the government on Wednesday of infiltrating opposition demonstrations to provoke violence.

Maduro accused Lopez of leading a "fascist" plot to oust the socialist government, the political legacy of the late Hugo Chavez, and authorities issued an arrest warrant for him. He surrendered theatrically on Tuesday, dressed in white to signify peace, adorned with a crucifix from his wife and surrounded by a sea of supporters.

"If my jailing serves to awaken a people, serves to awaken Venezuela ... then it will be well worth the infamous imprisonment imposed upon me directly, with cowardice," he shouted from atop a statue of 19th century Cuban independence hero Jose Marti in a Caracas plaza.