Pakistan Is Under Pressure to Seize the Alleged Masterminds of the Mumbai Terrorist Attack

Secretary of State Rice attempts to mediate between nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi (R) listens as Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani (C) talks with US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice prior to a meeting in Islamabad. Rice arrived in the Pakistani capital Islamabad on the second leg of a trip to the region in the wake of the attacks in Mumbai, an AFP correspondent said.

Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi (R) listens as Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani (C) talks with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice prior to a meeting in Islamabad.

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At the top of India's most wanted list is Maulana Masood Azhar, the Pakistani who leads Jaish-e-Mohammed. He was freed from Indian prison in 1999 after a group of militants hijacked an Indian plane from a Nepal airport and took it to Kandahar, Afghanistan, demanding that he and three others be released in exchange for the plane's passengers. He formed his new group, Jaish-e-Mohammed, after his release.

In 2002, Jaish-e-Mohammed was banned by then Pakistani military ruler Gen. Pervez Musharraf, and Azhar was imprisoned. He was released later the same year and placed under house arrest until the Lahore High Court ordered that lifted in December 2002, much to the fury of India. The group later started functioning under a new name, Tanzeem-ul-Furqan.

Pakistan has its own most-wanted list of 35 Indians allegedly involved in bombings and terrorist attacks in Pakistan.

  • Read Five Lessons from the Deadly Mumbai Attack
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