Six More Names Added to Vietnam Wall

For some, the Vietnam War is still being fought.

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By Paul Bedard, Washington WhispersSomething huge is happening Monday at the Vietnam War Memorial. Six new names of soldiers killed in action are being added and the designation of 11 others are being changed. It's not only a solemn event for the families of the soldiers, but a remarkable engraving and architectural feat that the public is being invited to watch.Here's what the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund just sent us about the Monday ceremony:
SIX NAMES TO BE ADDED TO THE VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIALPress Event to be held Tuesday, May 4, at 10 a.m. (Rain Date May 5)Washington, D.C. — The names of six American servicemen will be inscribed on the black granite walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial next week, and the status designations will be changed for 11 others whose names are already on The Wall, announced Jan C. Scruggs, founder and president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF). A press event at 10 a.m. on May 4 will be held to allow the media and general public to witness the addition of one name.Work will begin April 29 and proceed through May 4. The May 4 press event will showcase the addition of one name, that of Army Lt. Col. William L. Taylor, whose name will be added to Panel 7W, Line 81 of the Memorial.In a short ceremony before the name addition, JC Cummings, AIA, the architect of record for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, will offer some history of the Memorial and the addition of names. Expert stoneworker James Lee of Colorado-based Engrave Write, who will be adding the names, will give details about the process. VVMF President Jan Scruggs will offer remarks. Family members of all the service members whose names are being added to The Wall will be on hand, and a member of each family will speak about their family member whose name is being added and what the day means to them.By May 4, the other names will have been added and all of the designations will have been changed. A variety of factors, including the weather and where the sun is hitting The Wall, determine when each of the changes or additions is made. When names are added, the highly technical procedure requires meticulous work to match the stroke and depth of the surrounding names to within one-thousandth of an inch.The six names being added this year meet the Department of Defense (DOD) criteria for addition to The Wall: all of the men died as a result of wounds sustained in the combat zone during the Vietnam War.Names Being Added to The WallLance Cpl. John E. Granville, U.S. Marine CorpsLos Angeles, Calif..Jan. 7, 1949 – April 26, 2007Date of Casualty: June 12, 1968Wall Location: Panel 56W, Line 34The Department of Defense (DOD) ruled that medical evidence submitted by the Department of the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) about Lance Cpl. Granville shows that he qualifies as having "died as a result of wounds (combat or hostile related) sustained in the combat zone" due to the amputations that he received as a result of his wounds.Lance Cpl. Clayton K. Hough Jr., U.S. Marine CorpsHolyoke, Mass.Oct. 1, 1947 – Feb. 9, 2004Date of Casualty: Feb. 22, 1969Wall Location: Panel 8W, Line 3Medical evidence submitted by the Department of the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) indicates that Lance Cpl. Hough qualifies as having "died as a result of wounds (combat or hostile related) sustained in the combat zone" due to the amputations that he received as a result of his wounds.Capt. Edward F. Miles, U.S. ArmyManhasset, N.Y.Aug. 17, 1944 – Jan. 26, 2004Date of Casualty: April 26, 1969Wall Location: Panel 26W, Line 55The U. S. Army Office of the Surgeon General (OTSG) has made the determination that Capt. Miles died as a result of wounds sustained on April 26, 1969 from a "booby trap" set by hostile forces.Sgt. Michael J. Morehouse, U.S. ArmyCovington, Ky.Feb. 15, 1949 – Aug. 14, 2004Date of Casualty: April 1969Wall Location: Panel 26W, Line 1The U. S. Army Office of the Surgeon General (OTSG) has made the determination that Sgt. Morehouse died as a result of wounds sustained by hostile action in April of 1969 in Vietnam.