Bradley Manning-WikiLeaks Case Turns to Sentencing

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted by military police as he leaves after the first day of closing arguments in his military trial on July 25, 2013, in Fort Meade, Md.
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"It is a dangerous precedent and an example of national security extremism," he told reporters at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, which is sheltering him. "This has never been a fair trial."

Federal authorities are looking into whether Assange can be prosecuted. He has been holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London to avoid extradition to Sweden on sex-crimes allegations.

The material WikiLeaks began publishing in 2010 documented complaints of abuses against Iraqi detainees, a U.S. tally of civilian deaths in Iraq, and America's weak support for the government of Tunisia — a disclosure Manning supporters said helped trigger the Middle Eastern pro-democracy uprisings known as the Arab Spring.

To prove aiding the enemy, prosecutors had to show Manning had "actual knowledge" the material he leaked would be seen by al-Qaida and that he had "general evil intent." They presented evidence the material fell into the hands of the terrorist group and its former leader, Osama bin Laden, but struggled to prove their assertion that Manning was an anarchist computer hacker and attention-seeking traitor.

More News:

  • Bradley Manning Prosecutors Claim Evidence of Bin Laden Link
  • Manning Verdict Tests Notion of Aiding the Enemy
  • Judge Denies Request to Dismiss Charges Against WikiLeaks Leaker
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