Christie Pushes for Faster Storm Recovery in N.J.

President Barack Obama and FEMA administrator Craig Fugate watch as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie meets with local residents at Brigantine Beach Community Center, Oct. 31, 2012, in Brigantine, N.J.

President Barack Obama and FEMA administrator Craig Fugate watch as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie meets with local residents at Brigantine Beach Community Center, Oct. 31, 2012, in Brigantine, N.J.

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Since Monday's storm hit, Christie has scoffed at questions about how Election Day will work on Tuesday, saying he had other priorities to deal with first.

But on Thursday, his administration announced that it was extending the application to apply for mail-in ballots until Friday and was arranging for military trucks to be set up as polls in spots where the regular polls were without power or destroyed.

It's unclear how many of the state's 3,000 polling places will be affected. The change means that some voters will be using paper ballots instead of electronic ones — and that's likely to extend the time it takes to tally results.

Christie also said Thursday that although Atlantic City's 12 casinos all have electricity, they will not be allowed to reopen until drinking water in the city is found to be safe and power can be restored to the rest of the city.

The governor is also trying to bring back more of the mass-transit system that is so important to the state, particularly residents who work in New York City. He said the federal government would loan New Jersey passenger cars.

About one-fourth of NJ Transit's cars were in flooded rail yards and are not ready to roll.

The first NJ Transit train to New York's Penn Station since before the storm was set to roll in Monday morning, but a power failure delayed the return of three other train lines, agency spokesman John Durso Jr. said.

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