Ryan Braun Accepts 65-game Drug Suspension

Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun reacts after striking out after pinch hitting during the 11th inning of a baseball game against the Miami Marlins Sunday, July 21, 2013, in Milwaukee. Braun, a former National League MVP, has been suspended without pay for the rest of the season and admitted he "made mistakes" in violating Major League Baseball's drug policies.
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"He apologized," pitcher John Axford said. "Whatever else was said beyond that, I don't think we need to carry outside of the clubhouse."

Braun met with MLB investigators in late June. Baseball's probe was boosted when Bosch, who ran Biogenesis, agreed last month to cooperate with the sport's investigators.

The suspension is the latest in a string of high-profile drug cases across sports. Cyclist Lance Armstrong, a seven-time Tour de France winner, ended years of denials in January, admitting he doped to win. Positive tests were disclosed this month involving sprinters Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson.

By serving the entire penalty this year, Braun gains a slight monetary advantage. His salary increases to $10 million next year, when a 65-game suspension would cost him about $500,000 more.

"We commend Ryan Braun for taking responsibility for his past actions," Rob Manfred, MLB's executive vice president for economics and league affairs, said in a statement. "We all agree that it is in the best interests of the game to resolve this matter. When Ryan returns, we look forward to him making positive contributions to Major League Baseball, both on and off the field."

Negotiations over penalties for other players haven't begun, according to a second person familiar with the probe, also speaking on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.

Rodriguez acknowledged using PEDs while with Texas from 2001-03, but has denied taking them since.

A three-time AL MVP, Rodriguez has been sidelined all season following January hip surgery and was hoping to be activated this week. A quadriceps injury developed while he played at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and caused him to remain on the disabled list. He is not expected at the Yankees' minor league complex in Tampa, Fla., until Wednesday.

Braun became the latest star tripped up by baseball's drug rules.

The sport was criticized for allowing bulked-up sluggers to set power records in the 1990s and only started testing in 2003. Since then, testing and penalties have become more stringent and last year San Francisco's Melky Cabrera was suspended for 50 games, just weeks after he was voted MVP of the All-Star game.

Four All-Stars this year have been linked in media reports to Biogenesis: Texas outfielder Nelson Cruz, San Diego shortstop Everth Cabrera, Oakland pitcher Bartolo Colon and Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta.

"I guess it is what it is," Cruz said of Braun's suspension. "I don't have any comment."

Other players tied to Biogenesis in media reports include Melky Cabrera, now with the Toronto Blue Jays, Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli and Seattle catcher Jesus Montero.

"It's frustrating to know that there are people who have played on performance-enhancing substances against us," Los Angeles Angels pitcher C.J. Wilson said. "Whether it was this year, last year, couple years ago — even the guys who got caught, it's not like they got tested the day that they started doing it, so I feel like this is the first domino to fall."

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    AP Baseball Writer Janie McCauley in San Francisco, AP Sports Writer Stephen Hawkins in Arlington, Texas, AP freelance writers Mark Didtler in Tampa, Fla., Joe DiGiovanni in Milwaukee, Jack Etkin and Mike Kelly in Denver, and Brian Sandalow in Chicago contributed to this report.

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