Pilots Faced Challenges Landing in San Francisco

(Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

The wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday, July 6, 2013.

Associated Press SHARE

By JOAN LOWY, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Experienced pilots say the challenges of landing at San Francisco International Airport were further complicated by the shutdown of a ground-based instrument landing system and the movement of runway thresholds prior to Saturday's crash of a Korean airliner.

The instrumental landing system, or ILS, uses radio signals to create a three-dimensional "glide slope" for planes to follow so they aren't too high or too low or too far to the right or left.

[READ: The San Francisco Plane Crash at a Glance]

Rory Kay, a major airline pilot who flew into San Francisco the day before accident, said the ILS for the runway where the Asiana airline plane crashed was shut down. He also said the beginning of the runway was moved 300 feet to the west to accommodate construction at the airport.

 

More News:

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.