In Speech, Romney to Promise Revitalized Economy

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The AP-GfK poll shows Romney has made particular gains among women after making the case that he's more qualified to make sure their families and the country are on a solid financial footing. A month ago, women favored Obama over Romney on the economy 56 percent to 40 percent. Now, the split has shifted to 49 percent for Romney and 45 percent for Obama.

Obama has tried this week to win over women on a social concern, abortion. On Thursday, the president made repeated, though indirect, references to Indiana Republican Richard Mourdock's comment that any pregnancy resulting from rape is "something God intended."

"We've seen again this week, I don't think any male politicians should be making health care decisions for women," Obama told a crowd in Richmond, Va. The president's aides pressed further, using a Web video to highlight Romney's endorsement of Mourdock and to accuse the GOP nominee of kowtowing to his party's extreme elements.

Romney, who appears in a television advertisement declaring his support for Mourdock, has ignored repeated questions on the matter.

Romney also has ignored the criticism and is instead accusing Obama of playing partisan politics in an "incredibly shrinking campaign."

"This campaign is growing. The momentum is building. We're taking back America," Romney told 12,000 supporters in Ohio late Thursday, the same night that media trackers confirmed his campaign was expanding its TV advertising into Minnesota.

The investment is described as a small buy that Democrats suggest is simply intended to generate media coverage and force Obama's campaign to invest there as well. President Richard Nixon was the last Republican to carry the state, in 1972.

Romney's running mate Paul Ryan also was spending time in states not expected to affect the race's outcome, with fundraisers in South Carolina and Alabama. Ryan was scheduled to join Romney for a rally Friday evening in North Canton, Ohio, before the vice presidential candidate embarks on a two-day, 400-mile bus tour of the state.

Vice President Joe Biden, campaigning Friday in Wisconsin, said Romney "meant what he said" when he was caught on tape saying that 47 percent of the nation considers themselves victims.

"Romney talks about victims. I don't know where the hell he lives," Biden told about 1,000 people at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh. "I don't recognize the country he's talking about." The Obama campaign has a radio ad playing heavily in Wisconsin keying off of Romney's 47 percent line and using it to question the Republican's priorities.

Obama arrived back in Washington late Thursday following a 40-hour battleground state blitz of eight states. He was taking a brief break from the campaign trail Friday and spending much of the day at the White House, with a trip to Democratic Party headquarters to film a live appearance on MTV. Turning out young voters who tend to vote Democratic is a key strategy for the Obama campaign.

The president also planned Oval Office interviews Friday with American Urban Radio Networks, which has a largely black audience, and Michael Smerconish, the conservative-leaning radio host who backed him in the 2008 election.

Obama also planned to talk to local television stations in swing states. And the campaign announced Friday that the president will travel next week to Colorado, Wisconsin and Ohio for a series of campaign rallies and events.

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Pickler reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Julie Pace in Washington and Philip Elliott in Greenville, S.C., contributed to this report.

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