Santorum Hesitant to Endorse Romney

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So, people close to Santorum said, he wants assurances from Romney that the party's platform would represent conservatives' interests, and that Romney would govern as a conservative.

Unlike Gingrich, Santorum also doesn't need Romney's help to retire campaign debt.

Gingrich has reported more than $4.5 million in debt. He is looking for other quick ways to pay off vendors and has rented out his e-mail lists to private businesses.

A better option would be a nod from Romney to his supporters that it's time to help the one-time foe, much as he did for former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, who bowed out last summer and locked arms with his rival. Romney thanked him with a check for $2,500 — the maximum personal donation allowed — as did at least 12 other family members.

Gingrich also leaves the GOP campaign with his reputation battered. He is looking to repair his standing as one of the party's intellectual heavyweights. Romney, now the party's leader, could afford him that platform.

But Gingrich hasn't yet committed to a joint appearance with Romney. He might just do it on his own and be done with it. Understated endorsements have been the norm this year.

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry announced he was backing Romney in a written statement, and former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman announced his withdrawal from the race and endorsement of Romney without Romney at his side.

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