Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo, right, and his wife Iriana Widodo, gesture after voting at a polling center in Jakarta on Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Multiple quick counts show Widodo beat his opponent, Prabowo Subianto, by anywhere from 3 to 6 points in the election.

Both Candidates in Indonesian Election Claim Victory

Quick counts show Widodo won the election by single digits.

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo, right, and his wife Iriana Widodo, gesture after voting at a polling center in Jakarta on Wednesday, July 9, 2014. Multiple quick counts show Widodo beat his opponent, Prabowo Subianto, by anywhere from 3 to 6 points in the election.

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo, right, and his wife Iriana Widodo, gesture after voting at a polling center in Jakarta on Wednesday. Unofficial results show Widodo defeated his opponent, Prabowo Subianto, by single digits.

By + More

Both Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo and former army general Prabowo Subianto claim to have won Indonesia’s close presidential election, foreshadowing a possible challenge to the final results not to be revealed for about two weeks.

Unofficial results indicate Widodo beat his opponent by anywhere from 3 to 6 points in Wednesday's election, according to The Wall Street Journal. The results are from credible organizations that have been accurate in the past. 

[READ: Indonesia Court May Decide New President]

Subianto refuted, announcing that quick counts were in his favor. But unlike Widodo, he did not reveal the names of the organizations responsible for his tallies, according Reuters


“There are many quick counts from various survey agencies. But … the one that will be valid according to law in the end will be the verdict of the KPU (Election Commission),” Subianto said on a talk show.

The Election Commission will announce the winner of the country’s third direct presidential election on or around July 22, one of Widodo's senior aides told Reuters. Once the decision is revealed, however, the candidates can challenge the counts in the Constitutional Court. 

Widodo, known as Jokowi, has made it his mission to eliminate any interference with the final count.

“Don’t tarnish what the people want today,” he said, according to The Journal.

Widodo and Subianto represent two very different types of leaders, but they both face a troubled economy and a divided parliament if they win the election.

“If [Widodo] wins the election it means Indonesians, half of them below the age of 29, want a leader they can associate with, not part of the elite,” Fauzi Ichsan, head finance adviser to the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle, Widodo's party, told Bloomberg BusinessWeek. “They want a leader who seems approachable, part of the, has suffered like them.”

[ALSO: Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo Leads Early Quick Count]

Widodo entered the political arenawhen he became mayor of Solo, a town in Java. With a background in furniture sales and no former political experience, he quickly gained support and moved up the rungs to become governor of Jakarta, said Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

Subianto, on the other hand, has extensive experience in politics. His father is for the former cabinet minister and used to be married to the daughter of former dictator Suharto, reported Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

“While the debate so far has been how to maximize the country’s hold on natural resources, Indonesia’s future really lies with its human resources and how to best utilize the country’s young population to develop it into a manufacturing hub,” Wellian Wiranto, a Chinese banking executive, told the Journal.