A Tokyo Electric Power Corp. official, center, stands in front of journalists at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in November 2013. Japanese researchers said they plan to conduct a controlled meltdown to study how to prevent similar disasters in the future.

Fukushima Nuclear Plant Leaks More Radioactive Water

Fukushima nuclear power plant releases 100 tons of radioactive water.

A Tokyo Electric Power Corp. official, center, stands in front of journalists at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in November 2013. Japanese researchers said they plan to conduct a controlled meltdown to study how to prevent similar disasters in the future.

A Tokyo Electric Power Corp. official, center, stands in front of journalists at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in November 2013.

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The Japanese Fukushima nuclear power plant is purported to have leaked 100 tons of radioactive water Thursday.

Tokyo Electric Power Company told reporters the contaminated water overflowed from a storage tank after a valve to a water holding area was accidentally left open, Reuters reported. The leak was found by a security patrol who observed water dripping from the pipe of a containment tank, located 750 yards from the ocean. However, TEPCO assured reporters the water flow had not reached the ocean.

[READ: Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Continues to Leak]

Though the plant workers tried to contain the leak by attaching a garbage bag to the pipe, the leak did not stop till workers closed the valves, FoxNews.com reports.

"We are taking various measures, but we apologize for worrying the public with such a leak," TEPCO spokesman Masayuki Ono said. "Water is unlikely to have reached the ocean as there is no drainage in that tank area."

"We are now in the process of recovering the leaked water and the earth it has contaminated," Ono told reporters.

[ALSO: Japan Unveils Plan to Stop Radioactive Leaks]

The Fukushima plant has been plagued by leaks and complications ever since the March 2011 tsunami disabled the plant's cooling system for its reactors, the BBC reports. The temporary solution has been to pump water in an effort to cool the reactors. As the water becomes contaminated, however, it must be stored in secure tanks. This has created more problems and serious water leaks, including one last summer where 300 tons leaked out of a tank, CNN reported.

Regulators blame TEPCO’s problems on its careless handling of its equipment, FoxNews.com reported.