The insignia of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), circa 1970. It feaures a starry sky with a red vector or chevron and an orbiting spacecraft. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)

Asteroid 3 Football Fields Wide Dashes by Earth

Space rock reportedly traveled about 27,000 mph.

The insignia of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), circa 1970. It feaures a starry sky with a red vector or chevron and an orbiting spacecraft. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)

An asteroid with a 900-foot diameter rushed past earth Monday night, going about 27,000 miles per hour.

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An asteroid 900 feet wide rushed passed Earth Monday night, missing the planet by nearly 2 million miles. The celestial chunk of rock was recorded going about 27,000 miles per hour as it went by, CNN reported.

Slooh.com, a website known for tracking potentially dangerous celestial objects, streamed the event live from a telescope in Dubai, USA Today reported.

[READ: Asteroid to Buzz by Earth Closer Than Satellites]

Those who followed the broadcast were probably unable to observe much action due to the fact that the asteroid was "a little fainter than Pluto," Slooh astronomer Bob Berman said, according to USA Today.

Though this asteroid proved rather harmless, experts say it is important to monitor asteroids and investigate any possible danger they could pose to Earth.



"We continue to discover these potentially hazardous asteroids – sometimes only days before they make their close approaches to Earth," Slooh technical director Paul Cox said in a press statement. "We need to find them before they find us!"

[PHOTOS: Spectacular Snapshots of Space]

This asteroid comes almost one year after a 65-foot asteroid erupted near the Russian city of Chelyabinsk, the Los Angeles Times  reported. The explosion released the force of more than 20 atomic bombs, shattering chunks of celestial rock across the area while damaging thousands of homes and buildings.


"Every few centuries, an even more massive asteroid strikes us – fortunately usually impacting in an ocean or wasteland such as Antarctica,” Berman said, according to CNN. ”The ongoing threat, and the fact that biosphere-altering events remain a real if small annual possibility, suggests that discovering and tracking all NEOs (near-Earth objects), as well as setting up contingency plans for deflecting them on short notice should the need arise, would be a wise use of resources."