Para-snowboarder Evan Strong, mogul skiier Hannah Kearney and actor John Ratzenberger speak in the Chobani 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Countdown booth in Times Square on October 29, 2013 in New York City.

Chobani Yogurt Denied in Sochi Olympics

Russia has prevented U.S. Olympic sponsor Chobani from sending yogurt to U.S. athletes.

 Para-snowboarder Evan Strong, mogul skiier Hannah Kearney and actor John Ratzenberger speak in the Chobani 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Countdown booth in Times Square on October 29, 2013 in New York City.

A shipment of Chobani yogurt has been blocked from being sent to U.S. athletes in Sochi, by Russian custom officials.

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The trendiest breakfast of champions may not make it to the champions in time for the Olympics this year. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is upset because the U.S. Olympic Team sponsor Chobani has been unable to deliver its Greek yogurt to the U.S. athletes in Sochi.

The New York-made yogurt is being held up by Russian customs officers at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey due to "unattainable" Russian customs certifications, Schumer said.

[READ: Greek Yogurt Vs. Regular Yogurt]

"Unfortunately, this protein-packed, New York-made food has met a serious roadblock in the Russian government, thanks to an unreasonable customs certificate and they will not allow the yogurt into the country,” Schumer said in a release. “Not only is this nutritious food only intended for U.S. citizens, but our own food safety experts, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, are willing to back the food’s contents, so there is no acceptable hold up in getting this food to our athletes and ensuring that Chobani does not miss out on a critical investment.”

Schumer expressed his frustrations to the International Olympic Committee and the Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in a letter, where he requested the "immediate approval of the entry of this shipment of Chobani Greek yogurt," NBC News reported.

[ALSO: Unusual Uses for Greek Yogurt]

Schumer isn't the only one frustrated with the Russian authorities. The Department of Agriculture has pressed the Russians to give the green light, assuring them that food safety standards have been met for the dairy product, USA Today reported.

“At a time when the focus should be on our athletes, this seems to be a bureaucratic issue and we appreciate the support and efforts to do right by our athletes,” Chobani said in a statement to Fox News.

Another factor in play could be the continuing controversy over Russia's much-publicized anti-gay laws. Chobani CEO Hamdi Ulukaya told CNBC Wednesday, "We oppose Russia's anti-LGBT law."

That makes Chobani the third official Olympic sponsor to condemn the laws, according to GLAAD.