Snow covered streets are viewed in Brooklyn on the morning after a major winter storm blanketed much of New York City in 10 to 12 inches of snow on January 22, 2014.

Winter Storm Janus Brings Record-Breaking Snowfall

Winter storm blasts the Eastern Seaboard with snow, wind and single digit temps.

Snow covered streets are viewed in Brooklyn on the morning after a major winter storm blanketed much of New York City in 10 to 12 inches of snow on January 22, 2014.
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The Eastern Seaboard has been hit hard by the winter snowstorm known as Janus. The storm has blanketed the country from Kentucky to New England with some areas receiving nearly a foot of snow.

Though the snow has stopped falling in most areas, parts of Massachusetts will continue to experience blizzard warnings till noon, Weather.com reports.

"The greatest snowfall is likely for southern New England, where 12 to 18 inches of snow is a distinct possibility," said D. Hamrick of the National Weather Service.

[READ: Winter Storm Janus Forecasted to Dump Heaps of Snow on East Coast]

 

Accuweather.com reported numerous states having broken daily snowfall records. Philadelphia received a reported 13.5 inches, breaking the previous record for that date of 3.4 inches in 1917.

Temperatures continue to plummet with many areas like Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York and Boston enduring temperatures well into the single digits, with wind chills pushing the thermometer below zero, CNN reports.

Commuters and travelers also continue to encounter dangerous road conditions, Time indicated.

Some 1,400 flights were canceled early Wednesday morning, on top of the additional 3,000 flights that were canceled on Tuesday, FlightAware.com reported. Every major hub was affected by the storm, according to Accuweather.com.

"I got a call that (my flight) was canceled and I couldn't reschedule until Thursday," Susan Otterstrom, a stranded passenger at New York's LaGuardia Airport told WPIX.

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Many school districts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut, Virginia, and Kentucky will remain closed, the Associated Press reports.

And though federal offices are opening on a two-hour delay, many officials and businesses across the region have encouraged people to stay home so snow plows and crews can remove snow from major streets, CNN reports.

The storm is forecast to move to the Atlantic Ocean later this morning, Accuweather.com reported.

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