Rescue workers look for survivors and clear debris at the site of a building that collapsed Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, in Mumbai, India.

Building Collapse in Mumbai, India, Leaves at Least 8 Dead

The nation is plagued by poor construction regulations, reports say.

Rescue workers look for survivors and clear debris at the site of a building that collapsed Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, in Mumbai, India.
By + More

Authorities confirmed at least eight dead after a five story residential building collapsed early Friday morning in Mumbai, India, the third building disaster in six months in a city plagued by poor infrastructure regulations.

Rescuers freed at least 32 people from the wreckage by the late afternoon, including a young girl who was pulled out 12 hours after the building collapsed, reported The Associated Press, but feared for more than 30 that were still trapped inside. Alok Awasthi, local commander of the National Disaster Response Force, said rescuers would work "24/7 without stopping until everyone is found."

[READ: Earthquake in Pakistan Kills 46 People]

 

The building gave way just after 6 a.m.

Murli Khadpekar, a neighbor, told The New York Times that the municipal corporation had deemed the building unsafe and had issued two notices to city government to repair it.

Police arrested nine people suspected of colluding to illegally construct a high-rise apartment building in a Mumbai suburb that killed 74 people when it collapsed in April. Another 20 died in June when two more buildings caved in.

It's a common occurrence across India, where contractors are known to expedite the construction process in response to inflated land prices, according to The Times.

[OPINION: India Undermines Its Own Economy]

"Because these buildings come up so quickly, the quality is always very bad," Sandeep Malvi, public relations officer for the Thane Municipal Corporation, told The New York Times in April.

India is one of the only countries in the world that does not use premixed concrete for construction operations more than two stories tall, The New York Times reported. Though some governments mandate this requirement, most places are not populated by workers who are willing to carry loads of hand-mixed concrete up multiple flights of stairs.

More News: