Burger King says its new "Satisfries" will have 20 percent fewer calories and 30 percent less fat than its regular fries.

Have it Your Way, America: Burger King to Unveil Low-Calorie Fries

New 'Satisfries' have 30 percent less fat and 20 percent fewer calories than traditional fries.

Burger King says its new "Satisfries" will have 20 percent fewer calories and 30 percent less fat than its regular fries.
By SHARE

Burger King will join the fray for low-calorie fast food dominance when they unveil a french fry option that has 30 percent less fat and 20 percent fewer calories than its current product.

The product, dubbed "Satisfries," is essentially the same as its traditional line of fries, with the exception of two changes: They will be crinkle cut, and a few ingredients are re-configured so that the potatoes absorb less oil.

USA Today reported that Burger King is tight lipped on what exactly makes these fries absorb less oil. Studies have shown that adding modified starches to frying batters can decrease oil absorption in foods.

[READ: Fast-Food Workers Nationwide to Stage Walkouts]

The idea behind Satisfries is no reinvention of the wheel by any means. Low calorie items of popular products, such as Nabisco's 100 Calorie packs and Lays baked chips, have lined grocery store aisles for years now.

Nor is Burger King the first fast food company to dive into the low calorie craze. McDonalds unveiled their lower-calorie line of snack wraps last year, while Subway currently has an ad out claiming to have broken the "200 calorie breakfast barrier" in the form of a flatbread sandwich.

The Satisfries may be another entry in an ongoing trend, but that does not guarantee a successful product. Restaurants have struggled getting customers to buy into their healthy choices. A 2010 survey by food research firm Technomic suggests that while 47 percent of Americans want healthier items on restaurant menus, only about 23 percent actually order them.

[READ: CDC: Excessive Alcohol Use Costs States Billions]

"We know that attitudes are changing and our consumers are becoming more mindful of the foods that they eat. But changing attitudes is much different than changing behavior," Burger King CEO Eric Hirschhorn told Time at a Satisfries tasting event.

In 2004, McDonald's began offering apple slices as an alternative for french fries in Happy Meals. However, the company reported in 2011 that on average, only 88 percent of customers were aware of the option and only 11 percent actually ordered fruit over fries.

More News: