If the 2014 Farmers' Almanac's forecast for this winter is correct, MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. might look like this come Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2, 2014.

Farmers' Almanac Forecasts Snow on Super Bowl

The 197-year-old publication predicts “heavy winter weather” for first open-air cold-weather Super Bowl.

If the 2014 Farmers' Almanac's forecast for this winter is correct, MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. might look like this come Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2, 2014.

If the 2014 Farmers' Almanac's forecast for this winter is correct, MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. might look like this come Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2, 2014.

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National Football League team owners took a risk when they voted in 2011 to hold the 48th Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey, the first dome-less cold-weather site for the event in league history.

However, concerns over the possibility of a disastrous storm on game day may increase with the release of the 2014 Farmers' Almanac. The 197-year-old publication is forecasting a "piercing," "bitterly" and "biting" cold winter.

The almanac has red-flagged the first ten days of February for "possible heavy winter weather." The Super Bowl is scheduled for Feb. 2, 2014.

The Farmers' Almanac predicts the winter of 2014 to be a cold one for much of the country. (Farmers Almanac)

"But even if we are off by a day or two with the timing of copious wind, rain, and snow, we wish to stress that this particular part of the winter season will be particularly volatile and especially turbulent," read a post on the Almanac's website.

The Farmers' Almanac has been in publication since 1818, and its method of utilizing planetary positions, lunar cycles and sunspots for predicting weather patterns has remained largely untouched since its inception. The almanac claims its forecasts are correct about 80 percent of the time.

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League officials have reportedly discussed a contingency plan should a blizzard strike the New York City metropolitan area, including delaying the game for several days. At the annual state of the league news conference in February, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said the outcome of upcoming Super Bowl would impact the league's consideration of future outdoor cold-weather sites.

"The game of football is made to be played in the elements," said Goodell. "Now, we hope they're not extreme, but we'll be prepared for that if that's the case. Some of our most classic games were played in extreme weather conditions. Some of the games that I look back as a fan and say, 'That was fun.'"

The coldest game-day kick off temperature was 39 degrees during Super Bowl VI at New Orleans' Tulane Stadium on Jan. 16, 1972.

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