A firefighter surveys the scene of a small plane crash on Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in East Haven, Conn.

Connecticut Plane Crash Leaves Two Dead

The bodies of a former Microsoft executive and his son were found following a crash that destroyed two homes in New Haven.

A firefighter surveys the scene of a small plane crash on Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, in East Haven, Conn.
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Bodies of a former Microsoft executive and son found following crash destroying two homes in New Haven

The body of a former Microsoft executive and his son have been found following a plane crash that destroyed two homes in East Haven, Connecticut Friday morning.

The Daily Astorian reported that Bill Henningsgaard, a former Microsoft vice president, and his son were killed when the multi-engine aircraft he was piloting crashed into a New Haven home at around 11 a.m. Two children, ages 1 and 13, were killed inside, while their mother survived.

The plane, which flew out of Teterboro Airport in New Jersey, was attempting to land at Tweed New Haven Airport. Tweed's airport spokesperson, Lori Hoffman-Soares, told the Associated Press that the pilot did not issue any distress calls while he was in communication with air traffic control.

 

[READ: US Airways Flight Grounded in Philadelphia]

"All we know is that it missed the approach and continued on. There were no distress calls as far as we know," she said. According to East Haven mayor Joseph Maturo, one of the two houses was vacant at the time of the crash.

"As far as the response, it was like a motor vehicle accident with two houses involved," said East Haven Fire Chief Douglas Jackson. "It was two structure fires and a fuel-filled vehicle involved."

The Hartford Courant reported several people entering the house, trying to save the children located inside.

"The plane was burning slow and then it started really burning," said Frank Diglio, who was driving by the crash site when he saw the mother of the two children crying. He entered the house with another man, but was forced to leave shortly after the flames began to grow.

[READ: Southwest Airlines Jet Crashes Nose-First in NYC]

"The fire engines arrived in like 10 minutes. They came real quick and they told us all to move. The house got really out of control," said Diglio.

In 2009, Henningsgaard was flying with his mother to Seattle to watch his then-15-year-old daughter perform in a high school play when a mechanical failure caused his plane to crash into the Columbia River. They were rescued by Columbia River Bar Pilots.

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