Protesters stand in front of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's Louisville office. More than 70 percent of respondents in a new poll support the Senate trying again on background checks.

Gun Control Poll: 62 Percent Want Senate to 'Move On'

A package of proposed gun laws remains dormant in the Senate after a pitch for new background checks was defeated in April.

Protesters stand in front of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's Louisville office. More than 70 percent of respondents in a new poll support the Senate trying again on background checks.

Protesters rally in front of U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's office.

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Sixty-two percent of Americans want the U.S. Senate to "move on" from stalled gun control legislation, according to a Reason-Rupe poll released Wednesday. Just 33 percent of respondents said the Senate should vote again on the bill.

The Reason-Rupe poll found that women are significantly more likely than men to want the Senate to take another vote on the proposals, which include mandatory background checks for all gun sales. Forty percent of women said the Senate should vote again and 54 percent said it's time to move on. By comparison, 72 percent of men said it's time to move on.

Only a slim majority of self-identified Democrats - 51 percent - said they wanted the Senate to vote again. The poll was conducted earlier this month with 1,003 respondents. Its calculated margin of error is 3.7 percentage points.

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In April, the gun control push was derailed when an amendment to expand background checks failed to garner the 60 votes needed in the Senate to overcome a filibuster. The broader gun control package, which could criminalize the transfer of guns among non-criminals, stands no chance of passing in the GOP-controlled House of Representatives.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., predicted after the defeat of the background checks amendment - seen as the most popular proposed regulation - that gun control would again be debated and voted on later this year.

"We may change the bill a little bit – but I think you may find some changes out there in the public," Schumer said. "Lots of senators who thought it was safe to vote against it because of the intensity are not so sure anymore."

A Washington Post-ABC News poll conducted in April found that 49 percent of Americans disapproved of President Barack Obama's handling of gun control, with only 45 percent approving of his performance on the issue.

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The April poll also found, however, that a majority of Americans support individual gun control proposals, finding 56 percent support for a ban on the sale of unspecified "assault" weapons, 56 percent support for a ban on ammunition clips larger than 10 bullets and 86 percent support for mandatory background checks for people "buying guns at gun shows or online."

Data collected since 1993 by the Pew Research Center show that Americans are more closely divided on gun policy now than they were in the 1990s.

Respondents indicated 50 percent support for "gun control" and 48 percent for "gun rights" in May 2013, according to Pew. By contrast, the polling firm found 67 percent support for "gun control" and 29 percent support for "gun rights" in March 2000.

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