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Aurora Shooting Suspect James Holmes Offers to Plead Guilty

If death penalty isn't considered, defense team promises 'speedy and definite conclusion' to case.

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James Holmes sits with defense attorney Tamara Brady during his arraignment in Centennial, Colo., March 12, 2013.

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Attorneys for accused mass murderer James Holmes released a two-page document Wednesday that offers prosecutors a guilty plea in exchange for the death penalty being removed from consideration as a method of punishment, Colorado NBC affiliate 9 News reports.

"Mr. Holmes is currently willing to resolve the case to bring the proceedings to a speedy and definite conclusion," the documents says, according to the TV station.

[READ: Who Is James Holmes?]

Earlier this month Holmes's attorneys were denied in their bid to invalidate state law on insanity pleas that allows potentially incriminating information gathered during a state-ordered psychiatric evaluation to be used as evidence if a defendant later changes their plea.

An insanity plea would not necessarily work for Holmes, and his attorneys expressed concern that he could incriminate himself during a psychiatric evaluation.

Holmes, 25, is charged with murdering 12 people and injuring dozens more in the July 2012 shooting rampage at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater during a showing of "The Dark Knight Rises."

[READ: Hunters Boycott Colo. Over Gun Law]

On March 12 the presiding judge in the case, William Sylvester, entered a plea of not guilty on Holmes's behalf after defense lawyers said they were not yet prepared to enter a plea. The Associated Press noted at the time that prosecutors are expected to announce on April 1 if they will seek the death penalty. The trial is scheduled to begin August 5.

"This just allows the defense to think through how they want to proceed," Denver defense attorney Dan Recht told 9 News. "The odds are the prosecution is going to pursue the death penalty and literally Holmes' life is at stake, so they want to be able to think through all the pleas they can offer."

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