'Star Wars' 7 May Bring New Hope, But Also Letdown

In this May 20, 2011 file photo, Disney CEO Robert Iger, left, and Star Wars creator George Lucas, third from right, talk to the Star Wars movie character Darth Vader, center, onstage at the Disney Hollywood Studios theme park during the re-opening celebration of the Star Tours motion simulation ride in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.
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Given the proliferation of storylines and characters in the "expanded universe," Kaminski said there's a good chance that some of those storylines will be cast aside, altered, or even contradicted outright.

"It will affect the 'expanded universe' one way or another," Kaminski said. "It's going to be hard to reconcile those different things."

The idea that the new films will diverge from what's out there is supported by Kennedy, who spoke in a video released by Lucasfilm shortly after the Disney deal was announced.

"This is not like a series of books like 'Harry Potter' where you've already got a template of what the stories might be," she said. "These are original stories and original ideas that come from out of a world that essentially is in George's head."

Beyond some broad strokes that the movies hint at — such as Luke's passing on the Jedi ways — it seems doubtful that such a creative mind as Lucas would surrender the movies' outcome to tales that have already been written.

That means that fans of the books, comics and video games in the "Star Wars" universe could be either disappointed or delighted by the result.

But if there were no surprises, the adventure just wouldn't be the same.

"Almost anything is possible," said Jay Shepard, a content editor at fan site TheForce.net. "But I don't believe it will be any type of plotline we've already seen."

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