Oregon Primary Facts and Figures

Results through the years, and 3 things you didn't know.

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The Oregon primary is May 20.

Presidential Primary Winners

Democrats

  • 1988: Michael Dukakis
  • 1992: Bill Clinton
  • 1996: Bill Clinton
  • 2000: Al Gore
  • 2004: John Kerry

Republicans

  • 1988: George H.W. Bush
  • 1992: George H.W. Bush
  • 1996: Bob Dole
  • 2000: George W. Bush
  • 2004: George W. Bush

Sources:
Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections
Oregon Secretary of State, Elections Division

Voter Registration Data

(as of March 2008)

Registered voters: 1,996,315

Source:
Oregon Secretary of State, Elections Division

General Election Winners—1988-2004

  • 1988: Michael Dukakis
  • 1992: Bill Clinton
  • 1996: Bill Clinton
  • 2000: Al Gore
  • 2004: John Kerry

Sources:
Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections
Oregon Secretary of State, Elections Division

Exit Poll Demographics

2004 General Election

Sex

  • Male: 45%
  • Female: 55%

Race

  • White: 93%
  • African-American: 1%
  • Latino: 3%
  • Asian: 1%

Age

  • 18-29: 13%
  • 30-44: 26%
  • 45-59: 31%
  • 60 and older: 29%

White Evangelical/Born Again

  • Yes: 32%
  • No: 68%

Source:
CNN

3 Things You Didn't Know About Oregon Primaries

1. In Oregon, ballots for primaries and general elections are cast by mail. Oregonians must mail in or drop off their ballots by Election Day. The Vote by Mail system was approved in the 1998 election and is very popular with voters.

2. In 1968, Robert F. Kennedy lost the Oregon Democratic primary to Eugene McCarthy (McCarthy: 44 percent; Kennedy: 38 percent). Kennedy's victory in California the following week was viewed as a strong comeback, but he was assassinated at his victory celebration.

3. Oregon's May primary is usually not a big factor in national elections, since the candidates typically have been determined by then. In 1996, state officials decided to hold the primary in March to enhance interest in Oregon. However, only one candidate campaigned there—Republican Bob Dole, who ultimately won the Oregon primary, and his party's nomination, decisively. In 1999, the Oregon Legislature voted to return the primary to May. This was partly due to the lack of interest in 1996, but also because the Democratic Party threatened to penalize the state for voting too early. Oregon's mail-in ballots would have been sent out to voters several weeks before the election, breaking the party's rule that no state may vote before March 7.

Sources:
Associated Press
Congressional Quarterly's Guide to U.S. Elections
Portland Tribune
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Statesman Journal