Former President George W. Bush speaks during a immigration naturalization ceremony held at the George W. Bush Presidential Center on July 10, 2013, in Dallas.

George W. Bush Misses Air Force One and That's About It

The former president did - and does - like working with veterans. 

 Former President George W. Bush speaks during a immigration naturalization ceremony held at the George W. Bush Presidential Center on July 10, 2013, in Dallas.

In eight years, the Air Force One personnel never lost former President George W. Bush's baggage. 

By SHARE
Since leaving the White House, President George W. Bush has applied an under-the-radar approach to his post-presidency. But on Wednesday, he popped back onto the political scene, appearing with second lady Jill Biden at his Bush Institute in Dallas to talk vets.


“A lot of people ask me, you know, do I miss much about being president?” Bush said. “And the answer is really no.”

Bush said he missed the people that he served with and another big perk.

“I miss Air Force One,” he said. “In eight years they never lost my baggage.”

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More seriously though, the former commander-in-chief talked about his big mission these days: supporting the veterans that fought in post 9/11 wars. Since Bush left office, he’s been holding various military-themed sporting events. There’s the 36-hole golf tournament, the Warrior Open, held in Dallas each fall. And in spring, Bush opens up his Crawford, Texas, ranch for the three-day Warrior 100K mountain bike ride, where he peddles alongside the wounded vets.

This week, Bush got more scholarly, talking about what he calls the military-civilian divide and how employers are having trouble translating military service into discernible job skills.


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“That’s not surprising -- I mean you don’t see many job postings that say, ‘Wanted: experience hunting insurgents and terrorists, willing to risk life for coworkers,’” the former president said. “What’s a veteran supposed to put down? My last office was a Humvee?”


For those vets that need to update their skills, part of the George W. Bush Institute’s Military Service Initiative aims at making the academic experience at American colleges and universities more accommodating to veterans who often voice they have problems fitting in.

“At the Bush Center we believe it’s never too late to learn a new skill,” Bush said. “Just ask Laura … a few years ago she didn’t think she was marrying an oil painter.”