Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Dr. Jill Biden arrive for the Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony in the East Room of the White House on Nov. 20, 2013, in Washington, D.C.

Jill Biden Details Joe Biden 'The Caregiver'

The second lady recently broke her wrist. 

Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Dr. Jill Biden arrive for the Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony in the East Room of the White House on Nov. 20, 2013, in Washington, D.C.

Jill Biden recently broke her left wrist bone when she slipped and fell.

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Dr. Jill Biden had been tasked to talk about "caregivers" before an audience at the liberal think tank, the Center for American Progress. And because of a recent mishap, by the time she showed up Wednesday, she truly knew from experience how important they are.


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“Actually it’s pretty ironic that you’ve asked me to speak at this conference because this past two weeks I have been in need of a caregiver,” the second lady said. “I broke my wrist and so you can’t even imagine how difficult it is to do the smallest things like open a bottle of Tylenol or open a bottle of water.”

Biden broke her bone when she slipped and fell and had her left wrist wrapped in a fashionable camouflage cast, which she showed off to the crowd.

In Biden’s case, the caregiving responsibilities fell to Veep Joe Biden and she said her husband did a great job. “He even had the opportunity to wash my hair,” Biden said. “Which is, for those of you men in the audience -- I’m sure you’ve probably never washed a woman’s hair, so it was quite an experience.”

Biden, who talked about various kinds of caregiving from helping a veteran heal from war wounds to taking care of an aging parent, hoped her speech would act as an appetizer to the White House’s Summit on Working Families, slated for this spring. The conference will connect CAP with the White House’s Council on Women and Girls and the Department of Labor to discuss policies that could help working Americans, especially women, who often take on caregiving responsibilities on top of full-time jobs.