Tareq Salahi Initiates Last Ditch Campaign Slogan

The crasher-turned-candidate hasn't given up.

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Handout for the write-in campaign of infamous White House party-crasher Tareq Salahi, second from left, courtesy of CrashTheVote.com.
Handout for the write-in campaign of infamous White House party-crasher Tareq Salahi, second from left, courtesy of CrashTheVote.com.

Well how's this for a campaign motto? Tareq Salahi, of White House-crashing, Bravo "Real Housewives of D.C.," reality star fame, is saying he's "not so bad after all," in comparison to Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Democrat Terry McAuliffe in the Virginia gubernatorial race.

Using that motto and the tagline "two wrongs make a write-in" (with the wrongs clearly being Cuccinelli and McAuliffe) he's making a last ditch effort to drum up support for his long shot Virginia governor's bid.

 [READ: White House Gate Crasher Tareq Salahi Doing Write In Campaign For Virginia Governor]

Salahi's political journey began back in April 2012, when he announced he was running for the governor's mansion, in part because Cuccinelli, Virginia's attorney general, had just sued Salahi in a dispute regarding his winery business. Since then, Salahi went from seeking (and not receiving) the Republican nomination, to running as an independent – which didn't happen because Salahi didn't get the necessary 10,000 signatures to appear on the ballot – to this latest ploy as a write-in candidate.

[MORE: Company to Film Tareq Salahi's Gubernatorial Campaign Faces Legal Problems]

"I am not so bad after all when you look at the choices," Salahi said in a release. "Let's make this a historic year with the largest number of write-in votes ever in the Virginia Governor's race."

Meanwhile, actual third-party candidate Robert Sarvis, a Libertarian, last polled at 11 percent, while McAuliffe led Cuccinelli 46-39 among likely voters, according to a survey by the Judy Ford Wason Center for Public Policy at Christopher Newport University. Sarvis' success is in part due to the higher-than-average unfavorability ratings Cuccinelli and McAuliffe have received throughout the campaign. In a recent Quinnipiac University poll 40 percent of likely voters viewed McAuliffe unfavorably, while 49 percent of likely voters viewed Cuccinelli unfavorably. Voters head to the polls Nov. 5.

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