Ron Paul Has 'No Idea' Who's Running for President in 2016

'I have no idea who's going to be running or what I'll be doing,' says Paul.

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Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., whispers to his father Ron Paul during a news conference June 22, 2011, in Washington, D.C.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., whispers to his father Ron Paul during a news conference June 22, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

Former Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, says he has no idea if his son will seek the presidency in 2016, or if he will be asked to hit the campaign trail.

"That discussion or subject hasn't come up," Paul told U.S. News in a Tuesday interview. "2016 is a long way off, so I have no idea who's going to be running or what I'll be doing."

The 78-year-old libertarian's son, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has openly admitted his interest in running for president.

In a Sept. 23 interview with WOOD-TV, the younger Paul said he won't firmly decide if he's running until next year. Recent polls show Paul near the top of prospective primary candidate lists.

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Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., whispers to his father Ron Paul during a news conference June 22, 2011, in Washington, D.C.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., whispers to his father Ron Paul during a news conference June 22, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

"It's still a little bit early, some of my supporters are still wanting to count the votes from last year," the elder Paul told U.S. News with a laugh.

The retired congressman keeps busy advocating for home-school rights when he's not sermonizing against Federal Reserve policies, a possible strike on Syria, National Security Agency surveillance programs and the approaching individual health insurance mandate.

Although they are apparently not discussing the issue, Ron Paul has significant experience running for president. He sought the GOP nomination in 2008 and 2012, and was the Libertarian Party's presidential nominee in 1988.

This isn't the first time Paul denied consulting with his son about a presidential run. During a Sept. 26 appearance on "The Tonight Show," Paul said his denial was "the truth." But he also offered on-air advice for his son: "be very cautious, you could get elected."

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