FBI Makes 500th Addition to Most Wanted Fugitives List

The 500th addition to FBI's Most Wanted list is a former professor who allegedly preyed on young boys.

By + More
The 500th addition to FBI most wanted list, Walter Lee Williams, is a former professor who allegedly preyed on young boys. (Courtesy FBI)
The 500th addition to FBI most wanted list, Walter Lee Williams, is a former professor who allegedly preyed on young boys. (Courtesy FBI)

The 500th person to grace the Federal Bureau of Investigation's "10 Most Wanted Fugitives" list was announced Monday: a formerly-tenured university professor who allegedly preyed on teenage boys in third-world countries.

[READ: With PRISM, FBI Has No 'Going Dark' Argument]

Walter Lee Williams was charged with sexual exploitation of children, travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct, engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places and criminal fortitude in April. Williams, who studied gender development, is suspected traveling abroad, often to the Philippines, for the purpose of engaging in illicit sexual acts with children. His victims were boys between the ages of 14 and 17.

The 499th addition was also placed on the list Monday: alleged murderer and rapist Jose Manuel Garcia Guevara. Guevara is suspected of raping and murdering a 26-year-old woman in the presence of her 4-year-old stepson in Lake Charles, La., in 2008 after breaking into her home. He was charged with second-degree murder, aggravated rape and aggravated burglary later that year.

 

Williams and Guevara's listmates include fugitives wanted for kidnapping, murder, theft, arson, racketeering and money laundering, among other crimes.

[VOTE: Should Obama Appoint James Coney as FBI Director?]

The FBI's "10 Most Wanted" list was created March 14, 1950. It remains as relevant today as it did then, Assistant Director of the Criminal Investigative Division Ronald Hosko said at a press conference Monday. Since its creation, 469 fugitives on the list have been located or apprehended, 155 of them as a result of citizen cooperation.

The FBI is looking to the public for help in finding Guevara and Williams. A reward of up to $100,000 is being offered for information leading directly to the arrest of either fugitive.

More News:

  • FBI Director to Undergo Questioning by House Panel
  • Oregon Muslim Sues FBI, Claims Torture
  • 'Whitey' Bulger's Attorney: FBI Informant File on Boston Mobster Was Falsified