Congress Wants Answers on State Department Employees Supposedly Fired Over Benghazi

The jobs of four State Department employees were put in limbo after the Benghazi attack.

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Senate Foreign Relations Chairman John Kerry, D-Mass., leads a hearing Dec. 20, 2012, on the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, where the ambassador three other Americans were killed Sept. 11. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)
Senate Foreign Relations Chairman John Kerry, D-Mass., leads a hearing Dec. 20, 2012, on the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, where the ambassador three other Americans were killed Sept. 11. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo)

Congress wants answers on the status of four State Department employees who were supposedly fired over their failures during the Benghazi attack.

In a letter sent to Secretary of State John Kerry Thursday, and first noticed by the blog Diplopundit, 15 members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee asked why officials supposedly ousted from office after an Accountability Review Board report on the attack said they displayed "leadership and management deficiencies" relating to security in Benghazi were instead placed on administrative leave and might possibly return to work.

[READ: Select Committee on Benghazi 'Unlikely']

The letter also chides Kerry for the lack of answers a month after he testified before the committee, and five months after the ARB report.

According to the Washington Post's Factchecker blog, none of the four officials at State are still in the jobs they held during the attacks, but instead "appear to be in some Kafkaesque bureaucratic limbo" during which they have department badges but no desk to speak of.

These employees include Eric J. Boswell, a diplomatic security assistant secretary, Scott P. Bultrowicz, a director of diplomatic security, Charlene R. Lamb, a deputy assistant secretary for diplomatic security and Raymond Maxwell, a deputy assistant secretary with responsibility for North Africa, according to the New York Times and U.S. News.

[OPINION: Why Benghazi Matters]

Maxwell, who is currently being paid but does not go to work, and who filed complaints with the State Department's Human Resources Bureau and the American Foreign Service Association over being disciplined, told the Daily Beast's Josh Rogin in an interview earlier this month that he had no involvement with decisions on security at the Benghazi mission. "The overall goal is to restore my honor," he said.

 

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