No, Donald Trump Is Not Actively Researching a 2016 Run

He spent $1 million on research in 2011, but nothing yet for 2016.

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Donald Trump gestures as he speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., Friday, March 15, 2013. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo)
Donald Trump gestures as he speaks at the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, Md., Friday, March 15, 2013. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo)

According to the New York Post, Donald Trump is researching a 2016 presidential run and has already spent $1 million doing it. The report says Trump is increasingly being asked to speak at Republican events, a supposed indicator of the party's interest. In 2012, the real estate mogul opted against a run after weeks of speculation.

The only problem: Trump is not actively researching a 2016 run.

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The $1 million Trump supposedly spent researching 2016 was actually spent for the 2012 race. According to Michael Cohen, executive vice president and special counsel to Trump, that "expensive analysis," commissioned in 2011, now sits on his bookshelf in the form of several books "five times the size of 'War and Peace'" and is affectionately known as "The Bible."

The books contain information about "what he would need to win over voters state-by-state, who he'd need to talk with and what needs to be done in each state," according to Cohen.

Of course, the publicity-loving Trump isn't ruling out making use of "The Bible" at some point down the line , with Cohen telling Whispers the research "remains relevant and useful should he elect to run for 2016."

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And Trump is slated to make at least a dozen more speeches at Republican events in the coming months, having already drawn packed crowds at events he's headlined, such as the Oakland County Republican Party's annual Lincoln Day Dinner in Oakland County, Michigan.

"Our normal dinners draw between 6-800. Last year, when we had Rick Santorum immediately after he won the primaries, we had 1400. This year, with Donald Trump? We had well over 2200," says Jim Thienel, chair of the Oakland County Republican Party, who attributes the crowds to a general public that's "tired of politically correct leadership."

Cohen says more evidence of the public's frustration with Washington is that Trump receives an "enormous amount" of email, letters, tweets and even faxes asking him to run for president every day. "It's way too early for anyone to be talking about a presidential run," says Cohen. "But of course his name recognition would do for him again what it did for him... when he was leading the polls [in 2011]. And he would have a very sizable infusion of capital should he elect to do this."

That, and a $1 million bible.

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