Washington's 'Snowquester' Becomes the 'Noquester'

Following on the heels of the sequester, the big D.C. snowstorm is the latest blot on Washington's reputation.

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A tourist stops in front of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 6, 2013. Area schools and many government offices in the Washington area are closed for the in anticipation of the snow that could blanket the region.
A tourist stops in front of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 6, 2013. Area schools and many government offices in the Washington area are closed for the in anticipation of the snow that could blanket the region.

In what can only be summed up as a mirror image of the current political landscape, the big snowstorm of 2013 that was supposed to have a grand, Earth-shattering effect on Washington ended up accomplishing little of its predicted bluster.

The "snowquester" ended up being a (wait for it) "noquester."

[PHOTOS: 'Snowquester' Storm Hits Mid-Atlantic, Sort Of]

As of Tuesday evening, a number of outlets predicted over 10 inches of snow that was primed to mimic "snowmageddon," the January 2011 storm that caused a massive case of gridlock and extensive power outages in the D.C. area.

Wednesday morning, before the grass could be covered by the white stuff, suburban D.C. schools closed, with the federal government quickly following suit, allowing people to hunker down and ride out the worst of the worst.

Only nothing ever came.

The worst of the storm found its way west of the city, with areas in Virginia seeing up to a foot in snow. Inside the Beltway, however, the public witnessed more of a cold soak than a crushing snowstorm. By 4:30 p.m., all winter weather advisories for the area had been cancelled.

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Predictably, people to turned to Twitter to vent their frustrations over what seemed to be a bungled forecast. Local weather personalities offered everything from mea culpas to forthcoming explanations.

I'll blog in a bit about this #storm Some places we get an "A" for forecast, where 70% of you live a "D" to an "F" I know @abc7news

— Bob Ryan (@BobRyanABC7) March 6, 2013

We will explain why the forecast went wrong in a review tomorrow

— Capital Weather Gang (@capitalweather) March 6, 2013

DO NOT EXPECT much more through the evening. #Rain and #Snow will continue, but only a nuisance. Umbrellas not shovels!

— Doug Kammerer (@dougkammerer) March 6, 2013

So in the end, Rand Paul's filibuster lasted longer than any winter weather that floated through the D.C. area. Because if there is one thing D.C. does better than hype, it's acting like wusses about snow.

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