New TV Series Might Boost Gold Standard Fans

Discovery's "Gold Rush" is a huge hit, especially among men.

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There's a new gold rush going on.

Presidential candidates have sponsored gold events, and some like Rep. Ron Paul have talked about returning to the gold standard, a favorite issue of Washington groups. Nearly half of America's voters and 79 percent of Tea Party voters are in favor of the gold standard. Also, gold prices are near all-time highs.

[Read about what happens if we end the Fed.]

And now gold is king on TV, prompting some gold standard proponents to herald the Discovery Channel show Gold Rush as a sign that Washington should hurry up and get on the gold bandwagon.

With 4.5 million viewers, Gold Rush has recently been the No. 1  cable show at 9 p.m. Fridays.. And it's tops among men across cable and network TV.

Jeff Bell, of the pro-gold standard American Principles Project, tells us, "Gold Rush reminds me of the presidential race. If we don't get returning to a gold-backed dollar onto the GOP agenda, the party will not be able to offer any solution to the monetary/banking crisis that is the chief source of economic stagnation."

Gold Rush star Todd Hoffman also sees the future in gold. "Paper money is just a promise from our government. The hard-working American deserves better than that; they deserve to have their cash backed by gold. It wouldn't be an easy transition, but it would be the only economy in the world that would be solid and stable." [Read analysis of the Fed's latest Beige Book report.]

The show follows the pattern of recent hit reality shows. Says Discovery: "In the face of the economic meltdown, determined men risk everything to strike it rich mining for gold in the wilds of the far north. Todd Hoffman of Sandy, Oregon, along with his father, lead a group of greenhorn miners in search of the American dream and a new frontier."

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