Morning Buzz: Jan. 22, 2008

President Bush and top congressional lawmakers will meet today to discuss how they can quickly boost the economy before it falls into a recession. They'll be looking at as much as $150 billion in tax rebates, business tax cuts, and funding for a Democratic-led call for food stamps and employment aid. While last year Bush and members of Congress fought bitter battles over spending, both sides have promised bipartisanship.

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President Bush and top congressional lawmakers will meet today to discuss how they can quickly boost the economy before it falls into a recession. They'll be looking at as much as $150 billion in tax rebates, business tax cuts, and funding for a Democratic-led call for food stamps and employment aid. While last year Bush and members of Congress fought bitter battles over spending, both sides have promised bipartisanship. 

Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama  took jabs at each other last night as the three leading Democratic presidential nominees took part in the South Carolina debate. The two front-runners blasted each other's records multiple times—Obama saying he was helping the unemployed while Clinton was a "corporate lawyer sitting on the board of Wal-Mart." Then Clinton saying she was fighting Republicans while Obama was "practicing law and representing [his] contributor . . . in the slum-landlord business in inner-city Chicago." Obama was especially confrontational over former President Bill Clinton's more and more prominent role in his wife's campaign. "I'm here. He's not," Hillary Clinton responded. "Well, I can't tell who I'm running against sometimes," Obama said. The two, along with John Edwards, will face voters in South Carolina on Saturday. 

Americans were again reminded of the Hollywood writers' strike this morning as Academy Award nominees were announced. The Oscars, which are scheduled for February 24, may be the next victim of the strike after the Golden Globes "ceremony" if writers and producers continue to struggle at the negotiation table. Writers Guild of America members have been striking since November 5.