Morning Buzz: July 31, 2007

The youngest member of the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Roberts, suffered an unexplained seizure yesterday. The 52-year-old was getting out of a boat when the seizure occurred and was mildly scraped up when he fell onto the dock. Roberts suffered a similar unexplained attack in 1993. After yesterday’s seizure, he was kept in the hospital overnight and passed a thorough neurological exam. Roberts was nominated for the Supreme Court in 2005 by President Bush to take the seat of retiring Justice Sandra Day O’Connor but was promoted to chief justice upon the death of William Rehnquist.

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The youngest member of the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Roberts, suffered an unexplained seizure yesterday. The 52-year-old was getting out of a boat when the seizure occurred and was mildly scraped up when he fell onto the dock. Roberts suffered a similar unexplained attack in 1993. After yesterday’s seizure, he was kept in the hospital overnight and passed a thorough neurological exam.  Roberts was nominated for the Supreme Court in 2005 by President Bush to take the seat of retiring Justice Sandra Day O’Connor but was promoted to chief justice upon the death of William Rehnquist.

The man who tried to blow up a passenger plane by igniting a shoe bomb is expressing no regrets as he prepares to spend the rest of his life in a Colorado prison. In 2001, Richard Reid, the “shoe bomber,” attempted to set off an explosion aboard a flight from Paris to Miami, but was thwarted as other passengers and crew members tackled him. A British newspaper got its hands on letters from Reid in which he was optimistic that his situation would change for the better.  The Daily Mirror did not say how it obtained Reid’s writings.

In 2000, Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska renovated his home, roughly doubling it in size. Yesterday, federal agents searched the house as part of an ongoing investigation of the 83-year-old senator and his ties to an oil company executive convicted of bribing elected officials. The executive, Bill Allen, is founder of VECO Corp., an Alaskan oil company that has received federal contracts worth millions of dollars. Federal authorities suspect that Allen may have helped with the financing of Stevens’s home renovations.  In 2004, U.S. News also reported on Stevens’s close ties to other Alaskan corporations, which often do not have to bid competitively for federal contracts. Stevens is known for bringing home a lot of federal dollars to his Alaskan constituents. For example, U.S. News reported in 2000 that, thanks to him, $176,000 in federal funds helped the Reindeer Herders Association.