Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks on May 14, 2014, in Washington. Clinton said in an interview with ABC News on Monday that she remains undecided about another campaign in 2016.

Republicans Pounce on Hillary Clinton's 'Dead Broke' Remark

Critics say the comment shows ordinary people can't relate to the former secretary of state.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks on May 14, 2014, in Washington. Clinton said in an interview with ABC News on Monday that she remains undecided about another campaign in 2016.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, seen here in May, said in an interview with ABC News on Monday that she remains undecided about another campaign in 2016.

By + More

The rollout of Hillary Clinton's new book, "Hard Choices," has been brilliant. Until now.

The book's official publication date is today, and Clinton has been getting tons of favorable publicity in the past couple of weeks as her aides and presumably her publisher have leaked many details of what she has to say. These include a self defense against criticism of her handling of the lethal 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, and her focus on women's rights during her long public career, including four years as secretary of state.

But the former first lady, who is considering a run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, provided ammunition to her Republican adversaries with her remarks in an ABC News interview, broadcast Monday and still getting extensive media attention Tuesday.

[READ: The 4 Themes in Hillary's Book Excerpt]

What caused no small amount of ridicule of Clinton from Republicans was her assertion that her family was "dead broke" and burdened by legal bills after she and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, left the White House in January 2001.

The former first lady told ABC, 'We came out of the White House not only dead broke but in debt. We had no money when we got there, and we struggled to, you know, piece together the resources for mortgages, for houses, for [daughter] Chelsea's education. You know, it was not easy."

Republicans, hoping to damage Clinton's standing in the polls, pounced on her remarks. They said the Clintons really didn't have anything to worry about in 2001 because the former president knew he would be a big draw on the paid speaking circuit, and because the former first lady was writing a memoir that was headed for the best-seller lists. She was given an $8 million advance for that 2003 memoir.

The Clintons also own expensive houses in Washington, D.C., and Chappaqua, New York. Hillary Clinton is former U.S. senator from New York.

[READ: When Hillary Got to Maybe on 2016]

In 2009, when Hillary Clinton was poised to become secretary of state under President Barack Obama, the Clintons estimated their worth at between $10 million and $50 million, according to federal disclosure reports.

"How out of touch is Hillary Clinton when 'dead broke' [equals] mansions & massive speaking fees?" tweeted Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee.

Priebus also told The Associated Press, "I think she's been out of touch with average people for a long time. Whether she was flat broke or not is not the issue. It's tone deaf to average people." 

Priebus said Clinton makes an estimated $200,000 per speech and is actually wealthy, as is her husband.