Al Roker, center, will be among the weather forecasters to meet with President Barack Obama today at the White House.

Obama Presses Climate Change With TV Weather Forecasters

President to meet with eight weather forecasters at the White House.

Al Roker, center, will be among the weather forecasters to meet with President Barack Obama today at the White House.

Al Roker, center, will be among the weather forecasters to meet with President Barack Obama today at the White House.

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President Barack Obama's latest pitch for limiting climate change will be one of his most unusual. It's targeted at some of the nation's most popular television weather forecasters.

He is scheduled to give interviews to eight of them at the White House today, including Al Roker of NBC and Jim Gandy of WLTX in Columbia, South Carolina.

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White House officials say the president will make the case to the national and local TV meteorologists that greenhouse gases need to be curbed to lower the risk of floods, droughts, storms, and other severe weather. Limiting climate change is one of Obama's primary policy objectives for his second term.

A government advisory panel is also scheduled to release a report today, called the National Climate Assessment, linking the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to a spike in bad weather.

"The overall message is that climate change is happening right now – we can't think of this as an issue for future generations," argued Radley Horton, one of the report's authors, in a statement. "There are things we can do today to guide investments to protect the people and things that we value."

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John Podesta, a senior White House adviser, told reporters, "We obviously need all hands on deck if we're going to avoid the most catastrophic impacts."

Podesta added that the latest assessment "will be the most authoritative, comprehensive source of scientific information ever produced about how climate change is going to impact all regions of the United States and key sectors of that national economy."