Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says his party will have a "truckload" of negatives to use against Hillary Clinton, should she run for president in 2106.

Hillary Clinton Tests 2016 Themes in Florida Speeches

Potential presidential candidate backs Obamacare, women's rights in Sunshine State speeches.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says his party will have a "truckload" of negatives to use against Hillary Clinton, should she run for president in 2106.

Eighty-two percent of Democrats want Hillary Clinton to run for president in 2016, according to the latest CBS News/New York Times poll.

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Hillary Clinton is vigorously defending President Obama's controversial health care law and providing more details about the themes she is likely to use if she runs for the Democratic nomination for president in 2016.

"I think we are on the right track in many respects," Clinton said in Orlando, in reference to Obamacare. "But I would be the first to say if things aren't working then we need people of good faith to come together and make evidence-based changes."

Clinton also said in her speech Wednesday to the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society's annual meeting: "Part of the challenge is to clear away all the smoke and try to figure out what is working and what isn't. What do we need to do to try to fix this? Because it would be a great tragedy in my opinion to take away what has now been provided," CNN reported.

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In a separate address in Coral Gables, Fla., Wednesday night, Clinton said the key to America's success is more inclusion and equality for women, the poor, young people and the disadvantaged. She told 6,000 students and faculty members at the University of Miami "It is the work of this century to complete the unfinished business of making sure that every girl and boy, that every woman and man, lives in societies that respect their rights no matter who they are, respects their potential and their talents, gives them the opportunities that every human being deserves---no matter where you were born, no matter the color of your skin, no matter your religion, your ethnicity or whom you love," The Washington Post reported.


Meanwhile, Clinton's popularity among Democrats shows no sign of abating. Eighty-two percent of Democrats want her to run for president in 2016, according to the latest CBS News/New York Times poll. The survey also finds that only 13 percent of Democrats don't want the former secretary of state and former first lady to run.

[OPINION: A Hillary Clinton Campaign Would Be Bad for Democracy]

Vice President Joe Biden, her closest hypothetical competitor for the Democratic presidential nomination, lags far behind. Forty-two percent of Democrats want him to run in 2016 and 39 percent say he shouldn't run.

Clinton also has the support of more than two-thirds of Democrats for their party's nomination, according to recent polls. She says she hasn't made up her mind whether to run. Biden, who also hasn't said whether he will enter the race, is a distant second with about 10 percent support.

Among Republicans, 41 percent of GOP voters want former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush to run for president and 27 percent say no, according to the CBS/New York Times poll. Thirty-nine percent of Republicans want Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., to run in 2016 and 21 percent say he shouldn't.