Santorum: Romney Will 'Do and Say Anything to Get Votes'

Santo camp says rival will 'do and say anything to get votes' echoing WH line.

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After Romney's decisive win in the Puerto Rico primary Sunday, supporters of GOP rival Rick Santorum have adopted a similar line of attack that President Obama is using to characterize the Republican frontrunner's success.

[See pictures of Mitt Romney on the campaign trail.]

Though Santorum's strategists admit he lost Puerto Rico largely because of his statement that English should be the "main language" of the island if Puerto Rico is to become a state, they add that Romney distorted his rival's position and actually flip-flopped regarding his own support for English as the official language of the United States.

A Santorum spokesman said Romney will "do and say anything to get votes." This is a charge that President Obama's re-election campaign has been using relentlessly against Romney, and Santorum is trying to echo it for his own advantage.

Most Puerto Ricans speak Spanish and many speak little or no English, so Santorum's comment was very damaging to him. Romney said he wouldn't require English to be the main or official language of Puerto Rico as a qualification for statehood.

Despite the language flap, Romney supporters said it's time for the GOP to unite behind the Massachusetts governor and to stop the highly negative nominating contest in order to fully focus on criticizing President Obama and the Democrats.

['The Road We've Traveled' Causing a Stir Among Republicans.]

The next GOP contest is Tuesday in Illinois, where Romney holds a slight lead over Santorum in the polls and where 69 delegates are at stake. But Santorum is given a good chance to win Louisiana, which votes this weekend and has 18 delegates up for grabs.

If that split decision comes to pass, Romney would be the main beneficiary since his delegate haul would be larger than Santorum's.

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