Giant wind turbines are powered by strong prevailing winds on May 13, 2008, near Palm Springs, Calif.

5 Graphs About Wind Energy

A closer look at wind energy worldwide following elimination of tax subsidies in the U.S.

Giant wind turbines are powered by strong prevailing winds on May 13, 2008, near Palm Springs, Calif.

Wind energy is on a decline in the absence of a federal tax credit.

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Wind didn't have a good year. 

Investments in wind energy suffered a steep decline after analysts rightly predicted Congress wouldn't renew a tax credit for wind energy. The credit was 2.3 cents per kilowatt-hour of power windmills produced. Although 12,000 megawatts of wind power were added in 2012, by 2013 that number fell to 2,000, writes U.S. News energy reporter Alan Neuhauser.

[READ: End to Tax Credits Takes Big Bite Out of Wind Power]

Here's a round-up of graphs explaining global wind power potential:

Although this might be a stumbling block for wind power in the United States, analysts predict we'll continue to see investment in wind power worldwide. 

Right now, Asia leads the world for installed wind capacity by region. 

The United States has plenty of wind resources to continue investing in wind power. The masses with the highest wind speed are located in the middle of the country.

While consumption of wind energy in the United States has increased, it is still low compared to other types of renewable energy, such as hydroelectric power.