Santorum Up in Ohio Poll, Eyes Super Tuesday

Voters in the Buckeye State like the sweater vest.

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After a slew of state-level and national polls put Rick Santorum ahead of Mitt Romney earlier this week, a new poll out of Quinnipiac University Wednesday shows the former Pennsylvania senator is leading Romney in Ohio, an important Super Tuesday state. 

According to the poll, Santorum is beating Romney by seven points in Ohio, 36 percent to 29 percent, among likely Republican primary voters. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich comes in at 20 percent while Texas Rep. Ron Paul rounds out the field at 9 percent.

Like other polls conducted since Santorum's sweep of Missouri, Minnesota and Colorado last Tuesday, the Quinnipiac poll shows Santorum with a significant popularity among voters who identify as "conservative," "white born-again evangelical," and as members of the Tea Party. Over 40 percent of voters in each of those categories say that they pick Rick.

Another group that overwhelmingly supports Santorum is voters with an annual household income of $30,000-$50,000, with 50 percent picking Santorum in the poll. Romney's popularity jumps in the category of those with an annual household income over $100,000.

[See pictures of Rick Santorum.]

Still, only 50 percent of likely Republican primary voters say that they are sure about who they'll be voting for on March 6, echoing the volatility of Republican voters all over the country.

Likewise, the poll found that Ohio's registered voters like Romney better than Santorum in a head-to-head matchup with President Barack Obama.

A glance at Santorum's upcoming public schedule shows that he has his sights set on Super Tuesday. On Monday and Tuesday, he campaigned in Washington and Idaho. Wednesday he will be speaking in North Dakota.

The poll surveyed 1,421 registered voters by phone from Feb. 7-12, the day of and immediately following Santorum's three victories in Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado.

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