Casualties Climb in Moscow Subway Derailment

Investigators probe what caused the train to crash off the tracks. 

In this frame grab from video provided by the Russian Ministry for Emergency Situations, rescue teams work inside the tunnel in Moscow where a rush-hour subway train derailed Tuesday, July 15, 2014, killing more than a dozen people and sending many others to the hospital, many with serious injuries, Russian officials said. Officials vigorously dismissed terrorism as a possible cause.

In this frame grab from video provided by the Russian Ministry for Emergency Situations, rescue teams work inside the tunnel in Moscow where a rush-hour subway train derailed Tuesday, killing more than a dozen people and sending many others to the hospital.

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A Moscow subway train derailed Tuesday morning, killing more than a dozen people and wounding more than a hundred others, officials said. 

Reports vary as investigations continue, but the state-run news agency ITAR-Tass said the death toll has climbed to 20 people. As many as 129 people were injured, said Oleg Salagai, a spokesman for the Health Ministry. The Associated Press, however, reported 150 people were injured, many of whom are in critical condition. 

The Emergency Ministry blamed an electricity outage for the three cars that derailed, claiming that a voltage drop caused the train to stop abruptly. 

[READ: Subway Derails in Moscow's Rush Hour]

But Russia’s Investigative Committee does not believe that is the case and is inspecting possible technical causes of the incident after dismissing the possibility of a terrorist attack. “As you know, there are always specific people behind a technogenic accident. That is why I think that we will soon determine suspects in this criminal case,” Vladimir Markin, a spokesman for Russia's Investigative Committee, told ITAR-Tass. 


“People guilty of the tragedy will face not only dismissal, but criminal proceedings as well,” said Sergei Sobyanin, the mayor of Moscow. 

He added that one of the drivers has not been located and that the train was going 70 kph, or about 43 mph, when it veered off the tracks. 

During a seven-hour period, more than 1,100 people were evacuated from the subway cars, the AP said.

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Rescue teams work inside the tunnel where a rush-hour subway train derailed Tuesday, July 15, 2014, in Moscow, killing at least 20 people and sending more than 120 to the hospital, many with serious injuries, officials said.
Rescue teams work inside the tunnel where a rush-hour subway train derailed Tuesday in Moscow, killing at least 20 people and sending more than 120 to the hospital, many with serious injuries, officials said.

“There was smoke and we were trapped inside,” a survivor told Rossiya 24 television, according to Fox News. “It’s a miracle we got out. I thought it was the end," he said.

As the aftermath of the incident is resolved, the metro's blue line will be out of service for about two days.  About 7 million people daily rely on the famous underground system, built during Josef Stalin’s rule, The Wall Street Journal said. 

Bloomberg said the derailment was the deadliest event to occur in the city’s subway system since a twin suicide attack in 2010.