2 Pussy Riot Members Arrested And Detained in Sochi

Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova had returned to Russia after a tour of the United States.

This photo provided by Maria Alekhina, a member of the punk band Pussy Riot, was taken in the back of a police detention vehicle after she and several others were detained in Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014.

This photo provided by Maria Alekhina, a member of the punk band Pussy Riot, was taken in the back of a police detention vehicle after she and several others were detained in Sochi, Russia, on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014.

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Two members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot were detained in Sochi, Russia, according to their Twitter accounts and later confirmed by The Associated Press and Reuters.

Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova said they, along with a third member of the band, were forcibly thrown in a police van and detained for 10 hours Sunday and again Monday after walking around a suburb of Sochi near the Olympic village.

"At the time of our detention, we weren't engaged in any protests, we were walking around Sochi. WE WERE WALKING," Tolokonnikova said on Twitter.

[OPINION: A Shadow Over Sochi]

Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova initially gained international attention when they and another band member were arrested for performing a song in a Moscow cathedral protesting Russian President Vladimir Putin’s connections to the Russian Orthodox Church. When they were charged and sentenced for two years in jail for "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred," they became a cause celebre, drawing support from Madonna, Lady Gaga and others concerned about Russia’s recent human rights issues.

They were released early from their terms in December as a part of an act of amnesty viewed as Putin’s attempt to smooth tensions ahead of the 2014 Olympics Winter Games. Since being freed Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova have been touring the United States, appearing on “The Colbert Report” and playing an Amnesty International concert in New York.

In the lead up to the Olympics there was much concern about potential clashes between Russian authorities and protesters, as Russia has come under fire recently, particularly after passing a number of laws viewed as anti-gay in the human rights community. The games, which started Feb.7, had been relatively quiet on that front. Aside from some low-profile arrests, there had yet to be a attention grabbing demonstration against recent Russian policies.

Tolokonnikova said they had returned to Russia to stage a protest with a song called, “Putin will teach you to love the motherland.”