Pussy Riot's Punk Rock Prayer Is Just Beginning, Say Doc Filmmakers

Russian punk rockers were released from jail Monday.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot speaks to the media as she leaves the prison in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, Monday, Dec. 23, 2013.
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[MORE: Putin Frees Political Prisoner Amid Sinking Image]

Adds Lerner, "On a more unconscious level, I think they've had a profound effect, especially on a younger generation of people in Russia who now see what happens to people who do make a reasonable challenge to society."

While in jail, Aloykhina and Tolokonnikova released plans to start an NGO that monitors prison conditions in Russia. Meanwhile, the remaining members of Pussy Riot -- which functions as a loose collective of punk rock influenced activists -- continued to released politically charged music videos

"Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer" was recently named on the Oscar shortlist of 15 documentaries the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is considering for best feature documentary, with the five official nominations being announced Jan. 10.

"If we get the nomination I think the idea of Nadia and Masha on the red carpet would be quite an international coup," Lerner says 

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