Income Disparity Affects How Soon Students Enroll in College

Poverty, more than race and ethnicity, has a significant impact on how soon students attend college.

A new report found that poverty, more than race and ethnicity, affects how soon high school graduates go to college.
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Providing more opportunities throughout a student's K-12 education, such as greater access to advanced placement and college preparatory classes, and financial assistance for preparation programs can help improve student outcomes, Dance said. But to do so, schools need to gather the funding and resources to increase access for students.

"This is the most frustrating part, if you're in the education business. We don't need anybody to tell us what to do to make education better. We know what has to be done," Domenech said. "The problem is we that we can't do it because the support isn't there, the resources aren't there to allow us to do all of these things."

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